Should Our Least Racist President Have Admitted That The Second Amendment Had A Lot To Do With Slave Patrols?

If our president were really the biggest, best supporter of the 2nd Amendment, would he really have mentioned at the CPAC convention in National Harbor, Maryland today that, even for Give-me-liberty-or-give-me-death-Patrick-Henry, the militias referenced in the 2nd Amendment were often engaged in slave patrols?  Could it be that the president did not actually get into such nitty-gritty historical details because he is utterly innocent of any knowledge of American history?  He might not know the details, but he and his good buddy Wayne LaPierre know full well that Philando Castile did not have full 2nd Amendment privileges.

 

https://lawreview.law.ucdavis.edu/issues/31/2/Articles/DavisVol31No2_Bogus.pdf

 

 

 

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“I Like Students Who Don’t Get Shot…Just Like I Like Soldiers Who Don’t Get Captured”

The President did not “order [a] ban on bump stocks” today (Washington Examiner).  He did not “move to ban ‘bump stocks'” (CNN Politics).  Nor did he “take executive action to ban bump stocks” (USA Today).  He did not “say he signed [a] memo to ban bump stocks” (Bloomberg).  In fact he directed Attorney General Sessions to propose regulations on bump stocks, in other words he ordered up a commission to study the issue, with no deadline for action.  Maybe it will come to something, but very likely not.  For some reason, headline writers from CNN to Bloomberg to USA Today–as mainstream as it gets–are still giving President Trump more than the benefit of the doubt.  They are jumping far beyond what he actually announced, which is not helpful to anyone hoping for actual changes in laws.  The misleading headlines might even be unfair to NRA executives hoping for a good night’s sleep, because the president, as far as I can tell, gave them no real reason to toss and turn.

 

Update: Shame on the NY Times, which now has this as their top website headline: “Trump Calls For Ban on Bump Stocks.”  The news story itself makes clear that he did not do that.

An Update On Opacity And Inauthenticity At Facebook

Rob Goldman, VP for ads @ Facebook, has weighed in on the Mueller indictments, media coverage thereof, and Facebook’s glorious “No Collusion! No Puppet!” role before, during, and after our 2016 election.  Rob, you protest too much.  Facebook is not the only bad actor and guilty party, no doubt.  I am sure you are right that plenty of media coverage of Facebook’s role in the last election was less than 100% accurate.  But did Facebook really share proprietary information on Russian ads with Mueller’s investigators out of a pure-hearted desire to “help the public understand how the Russians abused our system”?  Your company is in large part the social media system.  Mark Zuckerberg said after the election that the accusations against Facebook were all “crazy talk.”  Are you old enough to remember that?  You can say all you want that “swaying the election was *NOT* the main goal” of Russia, but sorry to say your words are far from “definitive.”  Your point is apparently that disrupting and weakening our democracy was their main goal, thus the election was just a little detail.  That’s a truly silly argument.  Of course the cultivation of Trump, and Jill Stein, were means to an end, not ends in themselves.  But if you think that excuses Facebook’s inattention and laxity, you are way off the mark.

P.S. Mr. Goldman does have a point that Finland, Sweden et al work hard at promoting a well-informed citizenry to keep Russian disinformation at bay.  In the US we reacted to the breakup of the USSR by exhaling and fooling ourselves that Russia was a far-off problem we didn’t have to worry about anymore.  Unless we lived in Alaska, we couldn’t see Russia from our window.  Facebook or no Facebook, maybe we have learned better now.  But critical thinking might still not be one of our national strong points, alas.  Mr. Goldman writes “there are easy ways to fight [Russian trolls and bots].  Disinformation is ineffective against a well educated citizenry.”  Education is “easy”?  Really?  Facebook and other Silicon Valley titans do promote better education in some ways, but are Facebook and Apple and Google willing to pay more taxes to support better education for all young people?  Mr. Goldman links to an article referencing Finland’s “strong public education system.”  Does Facebook support strong public education in the USA?

Sessions Praises “Anglo-American Heritage” Of Policing, Trump Fires Back

President Trump immediately fired back today at Attorney General Sessions, who praised sheriffs this morning for upholding the “Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement.”  The president, walking toward his Official Presidential Limousine en route to give a lecture at the failing Newseum on “Macht, Herrschaft, and the Greatness of The Rule of Trump,”  demanded that General Sessions apologize for his comments and acknowledge the greatness of his favorite traditions of sheriffing and policing, namely the Germanic and Prussian.  At first blush the president’s rebuke of Sessions seemed to contradict his tweet over the weekend in support of “due process.”  Trump derided that objection as picayune and also treasonous, saying “I don’t need no stinking Magna Carta.”  At last check CNN, the AP, and the failing NY Times and fake-Amazon-Washington Post were all seeking writs of habeas corpus for their imprisoned reporters.

Remind Us Again How The Irish Became White, John Kelly

John Kelly, like all of us, is descended from some people who were “too afraid” and others who were “too lazy to get off their asses” to get their paperwork in order.  And I am sure he and we are also descended from some kings and queens and lords and ladies.

But tell us again, Kelly, in light of your insulting remarks about DACA people now wondering what’s next: how exactly did the Irish become white?  Did some Irish-Americans “become white” by adopting the anti-black racism of white American Protestants?  Noel Ignatiev’s book, How The Irish Became White, quotes Frederick Douglass, who said in 1853, “The Irish, who, at home, readily sympathize with the oppressed everywhere, are instantly taught when they step upon our soil to hate and despise the Negro….the Irish-American will one day find out his mistake.”  The becoming-white of the Irish in the United States of America is a long, complex story, which John Kelly and Sean Hannity and Bill O’Reilly and all of us would do well to study today,  with a more empathetic eye than I can detect from them so far.  If Democrats don’t want to take the deal that John Kelly says is so incredibly generous, so be it, maybe they are fools–but it sure seems like Kelly’s trash talk and Trump’s trash talk is designed more to avoid blame than to find a deal that can get through Congress.  Is that leadership?  We have a president who says he would “love a [government] shutdown” over the Dreamer/immigration issue: is that leadership, or passing the buck and trying to shift the blame?  It is probably going to be up to McConnell and Ryan and Democratic leadership to work out some kind of deal, probably temporary, and hope for better days down the road.  Dreamers will be left in more or less the same uncertainty they’re in now.  Kelly is truly out of line to question the motivations or reasoning or actions of people in a situation he can’t seem to imagine himself facing.  I do not want to become the victim of anybody, legal resident or illegal immigrant, and I expect my government to make some effort to preserve public order and keep me safe from evildoers, but none of that means I have any right to heap gratuitous insults on young people whose only real home is the US but who are still in legal limbo.

John Kelly and Donald Trump are just “joking” and “negotiating” toward a deal, some say.  Negotiating is great, and a sense of humor is a worth a lot (as Joe Biden said today, the president sure is a joke, all right).  And I say a president whose mother and father got here by way of chain migration, whose mother did not speak English as her first language and who arrived in the US with no skills, whose grandfather got here by evading the German draft and who got five draft deferments himself–a guy like that who talks the way he does about immigrants is a vicious little man who has no memory of where he came from or who he really is.  His chief of staff, John Kelly, ought to know better too, but it seems he’s too lazy to study it.  (Speaking of lazy, Kelly was asked if Trump had read the Schiff memo, which is about 10 pages: “no, no, it’s quite lengthy.”)  And when Kelly talks smack about Dreamers because maybe they don’t trust Donald Trump is dealing with them in good faith, he’s really lost it.

P.S. Meanwhile the annual trade deficit with China: $370 billion–is that still a problem now that Trump is our president?  And the annual US government budget deficit is headed toward a trillion dollars–problem or no problem?

Why Does Our President Hate Freedom So Much?

Today in Cincinnati the president accused Democrats who wouldn’t clap for his applause lines at the State of the Union address “treasonous.”  He throws out a lot of un-American garbage, day in and day out.  This was one of the more ignorant and trifling accusations he’s made.  Did it have anything to do with the Dow Jones down over 1000 points?  Did it have anything to do with the Nunes memo being exposed as a dud (at least if you think about it for more than 5 seconds, which the president hopes you won’t do)?  Did he toss out “treasonous” because he is feeling the walls of the Mueller investigation closing in?  It’s not good at all to have such an infantile person heading up the executive branch of our government.  He has no feeling at all for the freedoms that make our country as great as it is.

There’s no getting around the pickle we’re in, though many people protect themselves by tuning out most of the time and saying things like “politics has gotten all topsy turvy.”  True enough–but why?   One lazy, comfortable approach is to take the many cues from mainstream media that both sides are at fault.  I agree that both political parties are full of pompous and irritating people, but just a few moments reflection will tell you we are way beyond honest disagreements over the size and shape of government.  We have rolled the dice, bless our hearts, and elected a 71-year-old who acts like a 4-year-old, and not just any 4-year-old but an evil and malicious one.  Just because the only verifiable Christian doctrine is (as Reinhold Niebuhr said) original sin does not mean that “both sides” are equally to blame in American politics today.  We have chosen, heaven help us, a guy who demands that everyone clap for him and love him and bow down before him.  Democrats have some very real shortcomings, but if they are the only available vehicle in 2018 to check and control an out-of-control president, so be it.  Grown-ups, whatever their party affiliation, are obliged to face our dangerous political situation, hold their noses if necessary, and try to make it better as soon as possible, to keep our freedoms safe from the threat of our rogue president.

RIP Gene Sharp, Author Who Analyzed Strategy And Tactics Of Nonviolent Action

Gene Sharp, who died a few days ago, wrote the books on nonviolent political struggle.  In Waging Nonviolent Struggle (Boston: Extending Horizons Books, 2005) and his three-volume work onThe Politics of Nonviolent Action (Boston: Extending Horizons Books, 1973), Sharp dealt with nonviolent action as a potentially effective means of political struggle.  He did not presuppose that nonviolent action is a second-best method for those too weak to employ violence.  Nor did he assume that the high ground of nonviolence is an end in itself.  Nonviolence is a strategy, a means to an end, in Gene Sharp’s writings, and as Nobel-Prize-winning theorist of nuclear strategy Thomas Schelling noted in his introduction to volume one of The Politics of Nonviolent Action, “violent actions and the nonviolent are different methods of trying to make it unrewarding for people to do certain things, and safe or rewarding to do other things….Discipline, command and control; intelligence about the adversary; careful choice of weapons, targets, terrain and time of day; and, especially, avoiding impetuous recourse to provoked or purposeless violence, are critical to success in violent as in nonviolent action.  Most of what are usually called the ‘principles of war’ are…about as appropriate to the study of nonviolent action as to the violent….What Gene Sharp’s book does at every step is to relate the methods of nonviolent action, and the organizational requirements, the logistics and the leadership and the discipline, the recruitment of members and the choice of targets, to political purpose.”

 

https://www.aeinstein.org/nonviolentaction/198-methods-of-nonviolent-action/

http://www.wbur.org/news/2018/01/30/gene-sharp-obit

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/30/gene-sharp-dead-arab-spring-political-scientist

If Paul Ryan And Mitch McConnell Really Cared About Civil Liberties And Didn’t Want To Become The Franz von Papens Of The USA…

Re what Paul Ryan had to say in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia today: if the GOP really wants to seize the high ground on civil liberties, how about defending “one person, one vote” by defending America against partisan gerrymandering?  How about defending America against vote suppression?  How about defending America against the carnage happening every day by appropriating some real money to reduce opioid addiction and deaths–and pass some laws that regulate the ability of drug companies to push crazy amounts of opiates into little towns all over Appalachia and California and Florida and New Hampshire?  How about defending the respect for rule of law that was a big part of what actually made the United States of America as great as it is?

Mr. Ryan and Mr. McConnell: have you read the memoirs of Franz von Papen lately?  Do you care at all about defending our liberal democracy (small “l” and small “d”) from illiberal would-be tyrants?  Yes you do know exactly what I am talking about.  Franz von Papen and his fellow “conservative” aristocrats enabled extreme radicalism in Germany by convincing themselves that they could easily manipulate the vulgar and clownish Hitler.  Yes, Nazi analogies are alarmist and hazardous, but you, Ryan and McConnell, know very well what you’re up to, you know you’re enabling Trump when you tolerate and tacitly encourage people like Devin Nunes.  You know that when Senator Richard Burr, Republican of North Carolina, is not allowed to look at the Nunes memo, something rotten is going on.  You don’t want to be lumped in with Breitbart and Alex Jones, but that’s where you are now.