I Favor Zero Tolerance For Idiots Who Throw Starburst Candy At The Leader Of The Free World, Angela Merkel

Among the many “no, really, not-the-Onion” and not-funny-either stories these past few days, Donald Trump throwing Starburst candy at German Chancellor Angela Merkel and spewing out “don’t say I never gave you anything” at her–that is about the stupidest and most disgraceful, despite all the competition for “worst.”  Though the Melania Trump jacket that said “I don’t really care, do u” is bad too.  The euphemisms and denials are horrible, too: a person who says “tender age shelters” out loud should have their mouths washed out with soap.  Yes, I am sure that some celebrities and some so-called “leftists” have been vulgar and rude and profane.  I disapprove of their immature behavior.  But it is pretty hard to be disrespectful of the office of the presidency these days.  I favor a new policy: zero tolerance for criminal behavior by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.  Did you know lying to Congress is a crime, including lying about your contacts with agents of foreign adversaries such as Russia?  I favor zero tolerance for insider trading, which is a felony crime.  Hello there Wilbur Ross–have you no shame?  I favor zero tolerance for money laundering, even if it means a former campaign manager for a president, a man who, as the president pointed out, has served other presidents (and very possibly other criminals, I might add) over several decades–even so, money laundering is a felony, and there should be zero tolerance for money laundering, otherwise we become infested with money launderers.  If a money launderer makes it all the way to the presidency, that person should still face justice, in this life, and with zero tolerance for criminal behavior.  Mercy is important too–all in good biblical time, my pretty little Trump.

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Did Trump Sr. Pay Donald Jr.’s $7 Boy Scout Membership Fee With Money From His Nonprofit Foundation?

Donald Trump Sr. was never a Boy Scout, though his son Donald Jr. was.  It looks as if Sr. paid the seven dollar enrollment fee not out of his own pocket but with money from his nonprofit Trump Foundation.  Seven dollars.  Most of us have money problems sometime or other.  But Donald J. Trump is not just impoverished, he is destitute.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/politics/trump-boasts-of-his-philanthropy-but-his-giving-falls-short-of-his-words/2016/10/29/b3c03106-9ac7-11e6-a0ed-ab0774c1eaa5_story.html

Why Invoke Executive Privilege When You Can Just Flip Off The Constitution And The People Too

Of course Attorney General Sessions, while obfuscating, didn’t invoke executive privilege while testifying today before the Senate Intelligence Committee, because of course President Trump (whose name  it is an honor and blessing simply to be allowed to mention, as we all learned yesterday) did not and will not invoke executive privilege.  That is because Trump is no mere ordinary U.S. President.  His grandiloquent eminence precludes any stooping to invocation of privilege. More to the point, Trump already knows all the details, all the Russian connections.  No need to inquire or investigate as far as he cares.  David Simon’s June 8 Twitter thread lays out the case for Trump’s guilt as well as anything I have read or heard.  When an innocent person would look toward the door in expectation, Trump looks only at his nails, never at the door…

Caesar J. Trump: Only I Can Inform You That “Freedom Is A Gift From God”

Our president has signed an executive order, fatuous and largely redundant (because current law already protects what Trump asserts needs new protection), claiming to support religious liberty.  Setting aside the obvious absurdity of such an unrepentant heathen dilating on this topic–whoa, whoa, God can make use of even the worst abusers, OK, and I should know (please sit back down, Mr. President)….

Freedom, to be sure, is not a gift from government; at least if by freedom we are speaking of spiritual freedom.  And, furthermore, ordained and other religiously motivated persons may well have much of value to say about politics and even about school bond issues and tax assessors.  Speaking of whom, however, if churches want to keep the assessor away from their door, and maintain their status as tax-exempt entities, they should think several times before expecting political dominion to come cheap.  To their souls, if not their tax-averse selves.